Properties Tab

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Object size units

You may select the units in which the information on object sizes will be displayed.

To select the units

1Select Properties on the View menu
2Select the units in which you want to see object sizes.

You may select

Show as Bytes

Show as Sectors

Show as Bytes and Sectors

1.Basic information

This section shows basic information for a disk object.

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Drive Type

Device/disk type and subtype. Current R-Linux version supports the following types:

Disk, WORM, CDROM, Optical, Changer, Floppy, RAM Disk, LDM Partition, LDM Component, LDM Volume

and subtypes:

Device, OS File, Physical Drive, Mount Point, Partition, Volume Set, Mirror, Stripe Set, RAID5

Name

Device/disk name

Size

Device/disk size

Bus Type

Device/disk bus type. Can be:

IDE/ATA, IDE/ATAPI, SCSI, Floppy, USB, 1394, SSA, FibreChannel, RAID, SMART, ABIOS

2.Information on hard drives and logical disks

This section shows available information on hard drives and logical disks. These properties depend on the drive/disk type and appear only when applicable. Under Windows NT/2000/XP/2003, an IDE drive/disk may be represented as a SCSI device, that is why the SCSI Address section appears under these OSes for those drives/disks.

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OS object

Appears for image files under Windows 9x/ME and NT/2000/XP/2003, for drives/disks under Windows NT/2000/XP/2003 only. An object name used by OS to access the device/disk.

R-Studio driver

Driver names (both internal and OS) used to access this drive/disk.

Sector Size

Drive/disk sector size

Physical Drive Geometry

This section shows physical geometry for a hard drive. For a logical disk it shows the physical geometry for a hard drive where the logical disk resides

Cylinders

 

Tracks Per Cylinder

 

Sectors Per Track

 

Sector Size

 

Device Identification

This section shows vendor information for the drive/disk

Vendor

 

Product

 

Firmware

 

Bus

 

SCSI Address

This section shows SCSI information for the drive/disk

Port Number

 

Path ID

 

Target ID

 

Lun

 

Windows 9x/ME adds the following properties:

Int13 Drive Number

128 for the first hard drive accessible through Int13, 129 for the second one, etc. 0...128 for drives and other devices accessible through a Windows 9x/ME protected mode driver, if their Int13 device option is disabled. R-Linux can use Int13 disk access, and for some drive types, like SCSI devices, Int13 access is preferable. You may consider enabling the Int13 device option in the Windows Device Manager for such devices.

Int13 Extension Version

Int13 Extension Version Support for hard drives. Extended Int13 support is necessary for large drives. If this property is zero, Extended Int13 is not supported, otherwise, it shows Extended Int13 standard version, the large, the better.

3.Properties controlling access to hard drives and logical disks

This section shows properties that control access (read and write) to hard drives and logical disks. They are set to their optimal values and should be altered only if access problems appear.

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Drive Control

 

Maximum transfer

Maximum data size that can be read or written during a single access to the drive. If there are problems with drive access, decrease the value of this property

I/O Unit

Data size read or written during a single access to the drive is a multiple value of this property. If there are problems with drive access, decrease the value of this property

Buffer Alignment

Drive data transfer buffer is positioned at an address multiple value of this property. If there are problems with drive access, increase the value of this property.

These three properties are set by OS drivers. If the drivers set incorrect values, problems may appear during data transfer operations. You can alter them until data transfer becomes stable.

I/O Tries

Number of read/write tries during access to the drive. If there are bad sectors on the drive, increase the value of this property. This may help to successfully read those sectors. Sometimes, if the I/O Tries parameter is set too large and there are some unreadable sectors on the hard drive, the hard drive-controller pair may refuse to perform any successive read/write operations with the entire hard drive when it fails to read/write such sectors. In this case, set this parameter to zero.

R-Linux treats bad sectors in the following way:

It reads a certain part of disk (predefined by Windows) and

If Default read attempts is set to 0, the entire part with bad sectors will be filled with the specified pattern.
If Default read attempts is set to a non-zero value, R-Linux reads again that part sector by sector, repeating the attempts the specified number of times. If R-Linux still cannot read a bad sector, it fills the sectors with the specified pattern. In this case only the bad sectors will be filled with the pattern, but that extremely slows the disk read process.

For example, if you set Default read attempts to 1, a bad sector will be read 2 times.

4.Partition properties

A partition is a continuous area on a hard drive, characterized by its offset and size. There are partitions on basic disks, dynamic disks, and recognized volumes and partitions. R-Linux treats regions like partitions.

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Partition Offset

Initial offset for the partition.

Partition Size

Size of the partition.

Partition Type

File system type for the partition. If the record in the drive partition table is incorrect, this property may differ from the actual file system type for this partition. Still, R-Linux will process this partition correctly, as it does not use this property.

Partition number

Appears under WinNT/2000/XP/2003 only. Shows the number of the partition on the physical drive.

For regions and recognized partitions, Partition Offset and Partition Type properties can be manually corrected.

5.Compound volume properties

A compound volume is a union of several partitions or other disk objects. Each union type has its own rules, unique for each compound volume type. Among compound volumes are: Volume Sets (RAIDs Level 0), Mirrors (RAIDs Level 1), RAIDs5 (RAIDs Level 5), both physical and created by the user (Virtual Volume Sets, Virtual Stripe Sets, Virtual Mirrors, Virtual RAID5).

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Main properties of compound volumes are parents (disk objects from which a compound volume is created) and their order. These properties may be viewed in the Parents tab. For user-created compound volumes these properties may be altered.

Raid Block Size

Data block size for compound volumes of RAID (Level 0-5) types

6.LDM disks and volumes (Dynamic Disks)

LDM disks and volumes are volumes controlled by Logical Disk Manager (LDM). They are represented on a hard drive as a LDM database rather than partition tables. Under Windows 2000/XP/2003, LDM disks are also called Dynamic Disks.

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Offset of Logical Disk

Initial offset of a logical disk on a hard drive. For disks, initially formatted by LDM, this value is often 31.5KB, for converted disks, it may be larger.

Supposed Parents Count

Supposed number of parent partitions for compound LDM volumes. If the LDM database is not damaged, the value of this property must be equal to the number of parent objects in the Parents tab for the disk object.

LDM Host GUID

Global Unique Identifier of a computer system where this LDM disk group has been created.

LDM DiskGroup GUID

Global Unique Identifier of the LDM disk group.

LDM Disk GUID

Global Unique Identifier of the hard drive.

LDM Volume GUID

Global Unique Identifier of the volume.

LDM Disk ID

Local hard drive Identifier, unique within this LDM disk group.

LDM Partition ID

Local partition Identifier, unique within this LDM disk group.

LDM Component ID

Local component Identifier, unique within this LDM disk group.

LDM Volume ID

Local volume Identifier, unique within this LDM disk group.

LDM Disk AltName

Additional Alternative Name given by LDM to the hard drive.

LDM Disk DriveHint

Last name of the volume, under which is has been mounted in the system. May be either a letter (C:, D:, etc.), or a mount point under Windows 2000/XP/2003.

7.File System Volume properties

A File System (FS) volume is a disk object where a certain, supported by R-Linux, file system is present. There are two FS volume types: FS volume on a regular disk object and a recognized volume, found by a scan process. FS volume properties depend on volume's file system and type.

7.1.NTFS Volume properties

These properties are present for all NTFS volumes and represent their main properties. For recognized volumes, these values can be altered.

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NTFS Information

Regular volumes

Recognized NTFS

Recognized volumes

Cluster Size

Cluster size for the NTFS volume.

MFT record size

Size of one MFT record describing one file on the NTFS volume. This is an important property of any NTFS volume. Its common value is 1KB. If this property has incorrect value, many files may be incorrectly recovered.

Sector Size

Sector size for the physical drive. This property is read from the boot sector of the NTFS volume and does not affect R-Linux operation.

Index Block Size

Index block size for the NTFS volume. This property determines binary trees used to store NTFS folder structure. It does not affect R-Linux operation.

MFT position

MFT offset from the start of the NTFS volume.

MFT Mirror Position

Second MFT copy offset from the start of the NTFS volume.

Volume size

Size of the NTFS volume. This property does not affect R-Linux operation.

7.2.FAT Volume properties

These properties are present for all FAT volumes and represent their main properties. For recognized volumes, these values can be altered.

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FAT Information

Regular volumes

Recognized FAT

Recognized volumes

FAT Bits (12,16,32)

FAT type. 12 for the FAT12, 16 for the FAT16, 32 for the FAT32.

Cluster Size

Cluster size for the FAT volume.

First Cluster Offset

Offset of the first cluster from the start of the FAT volume.

Boot Directory Cluster

(For FAT32 only.) Cluster number where the root directory starts on the FAT volume where the logical disk resides.

Root Directory Offset

(For FAT12 and 16 only.) Root directory offset from the start of the FAT volume.

Root Directory Length

(For FAT12 and 16 only.) Root directory length for the FAT volume.

First FAT Offset

Offset for the first FAT table on the volume. Together with the Size of One Fat Table property, is a most important property for a FAT volume. If this property is incorrect, many files (especially fragmented ones) may be incorrectly recovered.

Size of One FAT Table

Size of one FAT table on the volume.

Sector Size

Sector size of the hard drive. This property is read from the boot sector of the FAT volume and does not affect R-Linux operation.

Number of FAT Copies

Number of FAT copies on the FAT volume.

Active FAT copy

Active FAT table number for the FAT volume. Can be set to Disabled, Auto, 1, or 2. If it is Disabled, R-Linux processes the volume as there is no FAT table present. This may be useful if the volume has been reformatted and thus a new FAT table is created and the old one is deleted. In this case, it is reasonable to recover files from the previous volume without processing the new and irrelevant FAT table. All files will be recovered as continuous byte chains beginning from their start cluster. Unfragmented files will be recovered successfully. If it is 1 or 2, R-Linux uses the first or second FAT table copy, respectively. If it is Auto, R-Linux uses both FAT table copies and decides, which FAT table copy should be used for a particular FAT table sector. This may be useful when both FAT tables are partially damaged.

Major version

FAT version.

Minor version

FAT minor version.

Volume size

Size of the volume.

7.3.Ext2/3/4FS Volume properties

These properties are present for all Ext2/3/4FS volumes and represent their main properties. For recognized volumes, these values can be altered.

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Ext2/3/4FS Information

Regular volumes

Recognized Ext2/3/4FS

Recognized volumes

Block Size

Block size of Ext2/3/4FS file system. A block in the Ext2/3/4FS file system is similar to a cluster in the FAT file system.

First SuperBlock Offset

Offset of the first SuperBlock from the start of the Ext2/3/4FS volume.

Blocks Per Volume

Number of blocks in the Ext2/3/4FS volume.

INodes Per Volume

Number of inodes on the Ext2/3/4FS volume. An inode is a record describing file's size, attributes, position on an Ext2/3/4FS volume - all information about a file, except its name, which is stored separately. Therefore, the INodes Per Volume parameter is equal to the maximum number of files on an Ext2/3/4FS volume.

Creator OS

The OS that created this Ext2/3/4FS volume. May be Linux, Hurd, Masix, FreeBSD, Lites.

Major version

Ext2/3/4FS version. Usually 1.

Minor version

Ext2/3/4FS minor version. Usually 0.

Last Mount Time

Last mount time for this Ext2/3/4FS volume.

Last Write Time

Last write time for this Ext2/3/4FS volume.

Last Check Time

Last check time for this Ext2/3/4FS volume.

Volume size

Size of the volume.

7.4.Recognized Volume properties

These properties are present for all recognized volumes, regardless of their file system type. They estimate how reliable those volumes are recognized. This is useful for fast search for, and selection of, optimally recognized volume to recover.

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Parsed File Entries

Number of files proving that this recognized volume existed. May have any non-negative values. The main property characterizing the reliability of volume recognition. The larger it, the higher probability that this recognized volume has file system properties that have been correctly found.

Parsed Boot Records

Number of boot records proving that this recognized volume existed. May be 0 or 1. This is the second important property characterizing the reliability of volume recognition.

Estimated Size

Estimated size of the recognized FS partition/volume. This property shows the most probable size of the recognized FS partition/volume. Alternatively, Size and Partition Size are set to the highest possible values in order to recover the maximum number of files.