R-Linux Settings

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You may specify some global setting for R-Linux on the Settings dialog box. You may reach it by selecting Settings on the Tools menu.

Main

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Main dialog box
Click to expand/collapseMain settings

System Options

Debug Mode

If this check box is selected, R-Linux displays an additional command Create FS Snapshot on the shortcut menu for an object with a file system. An FS Snapshot contains system data for the file system only (file descriptions without file contents). If a problem appears, this snapshot can be sent to R-Linux technical support to identify the problem. This option greatly slows R-Linux.

Edit Options

Enable Write

If this check box is selected, R-Linux enables you to write any changes made in the Text/hexadecimal editor.

Max changes buffer size

Maximum amount of data stored for the Undo command in the Text/hexadecimal editor.

Notifications

Reset all hidden notifications.

Click this button to enable all previously disabled notification messages.

File Systems

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File Systems dialog box
Click to expand/collapseFile Systems

Default encoding for HFS volumes

Select the national encoding for the HFS partitions.

Default encoding for Ext2/Ext3/Ext4/UFS volumes

Select the national encoding for the Ext2, Ext3, Ext4, and UFS partitions.

Disable any sorting

Select this option if the number of files on the disk is so large that R-Linux sorts files in selected folders for too long time.

Minimize disk access

Select this option if a lot of bad sectors are on the hard drive. R-Linux will reduce access to internal files in the file system to speed up the interpretation of file system data.

Show deleted empty folders

Select this option if you want to view empty deleted folders.

Log

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Log dialog box

Click to expand/collapse Log options

Logging


Maximum messages in the Event Log

Specifies the maximum number of messages R-Linux will keep in the event log

Save log to file

If this check box is selected, R-Linux writes its log into a log file specified in the File name field.

File name

Specifies the file name in which the log will be saved.

Type


File

If this check box is selected, R-Linux logs all events with recovered files.

File System

If this check box is selected, R-Linux logs all events with the file system.

Partition

If this check box selected, R-Linux logs all events with partitions.

Recover

If this check box is selected, R-Linux logs all events with the recovering processes.

Disk

If this check box is selected, R-Linux logs all events with disks.

Network

If this check box is selected, R-Linux logs all events with network operation.

Severity

 

Error

If this check box is selected, R-Linux adds error messages into its log.

Warning

If this check box is selected, R-Linux adds warning messages into its log.

Information

If this check box is selected, R-Linux adds information messages into its log.

Success

If this check box is selected, R-Linux adds success messages into its log.

NEVER WRITE A LOG FILE ON THE DISK FROM WHICH YOU RECOVER DATA!!!

Or you may obtain unpredictable results and lose all your data.

Note: If in the Recover dialog box the Condense successful restoration events check box is selected, the Log will display only Error, Warning, and Information event messages.

Known File Types

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Known File Types dialog box

You may specify which Known File Types will be enabled/disabled by default. You may also specify know file types to search for during a specific scan session on the Scan dialog box.

Click to expand/collapseKnown File Types

Reset

Click this button to reset the settings to the previous state. Active until the Apply button is clicked.

Select All

Click this button to select all file types in the list.

Clear All

Click this button to clear all file types in the list except some predefined ones.

Reload User's File Types

Click this button to apply new file types after the user's file types file has been changes from the Main tab.

Bad Sectors

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Bad Sectors dialog box
Click to expand/collapseBad Sectors settings

Default read attempts

Specifies a default value for I/O Tries, or how many times R-Linux will try to read a bad sector. You may specify this parameter for each drive separately on the Properties tab.

R-Linux treats bad sectors in the following way:

It reads a certain part of disk (predefined by Windows) and

If Default read attempts is set to 0, the entire part with bad sectors will be filled with the specified pattern.
If Default read attempts is set to a non-zero value, R-Linux reads again that part sector by sector, repeating the attempts the specified number of times. If R-Linux still cannot read a bad sector, it fills the sectors with the specified pattern. In this case only the bad sectors will be filled with the pattern, but that extremely slows the disk read process.

For example, if you set Default read attempts to 1, a bad sector will be read 2 times.

Set for all drives

Click this button to reset I/O Tries for all drives to the default value.

Pattern to fill bad blocks

Specifies a default pattern R-Linux will use to fill bad sectors in files to recover, in images, or when showing data in the Text/hexadecimal editor. You may specify the pattern either in the ANSI or Hex data format.

Note: R-Linux will never ever try to write anything on the disk from which data is to recover or an image is to create.

Memory Usage

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Memory Usage dialog box

These settings control how much memory R-Linux uses for its work. They help preventing R-Linux from locking when trying to perform very memory-consuming tasks like scanning large disks or processing file systems with a lot of files.

Click to expand/collapseMemory Usage settings

Disable memory control

If this option is selected, the memory control is disabled.

Automatic

If this option is selected, R-Linux will automatically stop performing the task when the amount of used memory reaches the specified value. You may specify the limit for either the virtual or physical memory.

You may see how much memory R-Linux actually uses on the Memory Usage dialog box.